Sunday, March 18, 2012

Ask the Perfumer - Sunday, March 18, 2012

I got a late start today, but I'll be here all day, until 10PM EST to answer your questions about perfumery.  Got one that you think will stump me?

6 comments:

  1. I have purchased some pink lotus concrete and for the life of me, I cannot figure out how to use it!!!! It's a thick paste and doesn't have much of a smell. Can you helpme?

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  2. What is the most unusual tincture you have done? When added to one of your creations what part did it play?

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  3. Hi Anya,
    I'd like to do a narcissus doppleganger, preferably without using anything overly rare. What would you suggest?

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  4. Dear Raphael

    Forgive my late reply, I had a marathon reorganization session here in the studio today. Dissolve the paste in a 20:80 ration, paste to 190 proof alcohol, by weight. Keep it in an airtight bottle, and stir it daily, perhaps a few times a day, preferably with a stainless steel or glass rod. Let it marry for a month or so, and carefully pour off the alcohol portion and filter. It is ready for use in a perfume. Keep the dregs, if you wish, and use it in a solid perfume, or, as I do, in a container, uncovered in my bureau or closet. There is still a lot of scent in it.

    HTH,
    Anya

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  5. Hi Sandi:

    That would have to be the goat hair tincture. I don't know of anyone else who ever did it (before me). I had it, and the Pan perfume I included it in, tested b y Sagescript Institute to make sure there were no nasty microbial surprises. It's also the only tincture I ever put through a micro test.

    xoxo,
    Anya

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  6. Dear Fallah:

    First, I would start with some narcissus absolute! You will use it as a base and build upon it, adding nuances from other aromatics, such as tuberose, jasmine grandi, clove, linalol (true natural isolate), and something indolic, if the jasmine isn't indolic enough.

    Of course, you'll work with tiny amounts, diluted to 10%, as I teach my students. Two benefits - you save money experimenting with these pricey aromatics, and you'll have already "opened" them up a bit, releasing their true scent, not their super-concentrated scent, which can be misleading.

    xoxo,
    Anya

    HTH,
    Anya

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